Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

As one of many millenials, I grew up with Harry Potter. It was the first book I picked out for myself in a bookstore. It was an old-looking, worn translation of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Harry Potter y la piedra filosofal). As an eager seven year old, I was happy to hear that there was a magical world out there that I was ready to discover. I became obsessed with the books. I asked for boxed sets for Christmas next to a bunch of young adult books. I was happy and it was my entryway to “harder” literature. Soon thereafter, I was reading Jane Austen, Emily Brontë, Shakespeare plays, and Golden Age Spanish novels as a young teenage girl. However, Hogwarts always had a place in my heart.  I went to midnight releases (much to my parents’ dismay) at Borders, I watched the movies and I reread the books over and over again. It was magical.

When I first heard about the Harry Potter play, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, I was a little confused. I thought JK Rowling had stated that she would no longer enter this fantastic world of wizardry that she herself had created. Nonetheless, I was excited. It was Harry Potter, after all…my own personal magical door to literature.

I personally did not attend the Midnight Release. Perhaps a former, younger version of myself might have enjoyed it, but I did not feel up for it. Still, my boyfriend was gifted a copy and I started reading next to him.

It is a shame to say that this book read like fan fiction…and not even good fan fiction. In fact, very bad fan fiction. I understand that the Harry Potter series and Cursed Child were written in two different mediums (fiction and theater, respectively), but still. Cursed Child still belongs in the Harry Potter universe and it makes no sense.

*Spoilers Ahead*

Here’s a list of complaints/observations:

  1. Hermione turns into a bitter woman because she didn’t end up with Ron Weasley.

Seriously? Seriously? Hermione: the SPEW advocate, the strong female role in the entire series let her whole life be controlled about whether or not she ended up with a Weasley? I call bullshit. #Feminism

2. Rose’s life matters, but Ron’s and Parvati’s kid doesn’t?

Flawed Logic.

3. Voldemort had sex with Bellatrix?

I’m sorry, but how can a man who split his soul into seven freaking pieces be able to, you know, provide his essence?? Delphi was made basically from one human wizard and one weird freaky nonhuman subspecies. This does not and will never make sense to me.

4. The future depends on the life of Cedric Diggory

…really? The most boring dude in the history of the world? It all depended on that one event at the Triwizard Tournament? I’m sorry. I don’t buy it.

5. How does this fit into the HP Universe?

I truly don’t know. I want to try and make sense of it in order to appreciate it better, but I didn’t need more. Harry Potter was a beautiful part of my life, but I would rather read ten different books about other things that happened in the world. I don’t need Harry’s scar to hurt again and I don’t need another skewed, backwards tale.

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The Neapolitan Novels

After finishing most Murakami books, I felt like I needed a change of pace and decided to delve into the NY Times bestseller list and, per usual, it sucks. I finally read the novel a billion people had recommended, Fates and Furies, and was severely disappointed by its writing, lack of originality, and plot. The writer herself went to school in Madison and I was very much looking forward to getting to know her work. Nonetheless, Fates and Furies left a bad taste in my mouth.

I had been hearing about Elena Ferrante for a while now and still had not read anything by her…then I requested My Brilliant Friend from the local public library. As you may have noticed, I am incredibly picky and, frankly,  rather snobbish about books. I usually favor classic books and pretty much dismiss contemporary options unless I’m impressed by an intrinsic narrative (aka Murakami).

However, this book is brilliant. Sure, it’s a translation (I have some reading knowledge of Italian, but that takes me forever), but it is so complex and honest. I cannot wait to start the next two books. Ferrante has an amazing writing style. Her story is poignant, classic, and timeless. I completely recommend her for a great read before the Summer ends!

Obsessed with Murakami

Last Spring Break, I read 8 novels: three of which were written by Haruki Murakami and two of them I fell in love with. I hope to continue my romance with Murakami this Summer as I explore new worlds, genuine stories, and uncanny narratives.

I had previously read Murakami, but just novellas (The Strange Library) and a short story (TV People). I liked him fine, but did not realize that there was still a whole new world left to explore.

Below are my short reviews or takes on the novels I have read by him lately.

1. After Dark

I started with After Dark and was initially very underwhelmed. It was a story about a girl who read books and drank coffee at Denny’s… of course, afterwards an unimaginable story breaks in, but the writing fell flat for me. The characters were unlikeable and the plot was not as interesting as I expected it to be.

2. The Colorless Life of Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage

I fell head over heels with this brilliant novel. This book consumed me from beginning to end so much that I stayed up until 3:00 am once to continue reading it. Murakami wrote a genuine, intelligent story about a relatively young man and the way with which he needed to deal with his past in order to move on with his life. It was an incredible mystery and love story (and not a boy meets girl type of love story). The characters all had their moment to shine and connect with our colorless protagonist. This is definitely a Murakami must-read! 

3. Norwegian Wood

I was a little hesitant to read this novel because (a) I had just finished The Colorless Life of Tsukuri Tazaki and did not want to be disappointed,(b) it’s one of Murakami’s most read novels, and (c) I’m always wary to read something named after a Beatles song. Nonetheless, as soon as I started reading, it I was unable to stop myself. Murakami, yet again, writes an intelligent, beautiful story about genuine people and their lives. I understand why this novel is so popular! It is amazing!

4. A Wild Sheep Chase

I was curious about this one because Murakami seems to be obsessed with sheep! He writes about the Sheep Man in The Strange Library and there are definitely a ton of sheep here. However, I was quite disappointed by it. I did not really enjoy this detectiveesque tale. Still, it was an interesting book.

Extra Reviews:

5. The Strange Library

I read this one in a Media Fictions course last semester. We learned how writing is a form of media itself and how much the materiality of a book (i.e. the way it is presented to you) affected the way we read it. This version of The Strange Library was genuinely interesting. We have a four fold book and half of the story is told alongside strange images. It also looks like a library book that you’ve taken out, which makes it even more compelling. It was a very interesting experiment, but alas…I did not love the story. Sheep Alert: you will see the Sheep Man here.

6. “TV People”

Ah…the weird surreal story that led me to the Murakami pathway. I taught this story in a Literature course at the university. It’s basically a very short read with a lot of weird things happening at the same time only to come to a very foreign, drawn out conclusion. Still…you crave more after you have finished.

Verdict: While I do love Murakami, I think his best stories are about broken people in this world. I have a hard time understanding the surreal worlds that he submerges the readers in. I believe that he thrives when he writes what he knows and when he doesn’t we still have a fantastic story that is somehow missing something. I would just say keep on reading Murakami because you never know what you might stumble into. Because of that, my love affair with Murakami continues…

I have also just acquired 8 more of his books so I will let you know how I feel about them afterwards.

OH…and he loves cats!